Our People

Holly Smith

Vice President of Strategic Initiatives

Specialties: Business Development Strategy, Marketing & Communications, Writing, Social Media, Messaging, Positioning, Group Facilitation

Home Base: Colorado Springs, CO

Holly brings 20 years of strategic marketing and business development, technical writing, and management experience to Optimetra and its clients. In addition to the Healthcare industry, she has supported the growth of organizations in the Defense, Telecommunications, and Software industries.

Holly realized early in her career as a technical writer that her extroverted soul was being crushed by the weight of engineers. She pivoted into business development and has never looked back. As Optimetra’s key client and industry relationship manager for over five years, Holly created numerous opportunities to observe and influence how clients position themselves for growth. She is now responsible for guiding Optimetra’s strategic direction, which includes exploring Health Tech and developing Optimetra’s thought lab, to curate and cultivate ideas that support clients in transforming their organizations for success in the next generation of healthcare.

Having collaboratively grown Optimetra from an unknown firm to a nationally sought-after advisor in public sector healthcare, Holly is an expert at developing practical and affordable marketing and growth strategies. She has a strong grasp of the competitive landscape in Medicaid and employs her expert analysis, branding, and writing skills to help you identify new business channel opportunities, establish a strong market position, and develop finely-targeted messaging that gets results.

Find out more about Holly on Linkedin.

Holly firmly embraces Optimetra’s core values. Read her thoughts on Judgment.

Holly Smith
The success or failure of organizations depends on the decision-making of leaders. However, poor decisions are not always the result of poor judgment. Everyone makes a poor decision from time to time. Judgment determines our willingness to evaluate our decisions and change direction when necessary. A poor decision is only compounded by an unwillingness to admit that it was a poor decision.